The Problem of Political Authority

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Hogeye 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #225

    Hogeye
    Participant

    The Problem of Political Authority
    An Examination of the Right to Coerce and the Duty to Obey
    by Michael Huemer
    http://www.ozarkia.net/bill/anarchism/library/PPA/index.html

  • #234

    Jacob
    Keymaster

    I’m curious what Michael Huemer would think of your webbing his book, in full. Someone asked him about his thoughts on intellectual property during a discussion of his book, and he suggested that people could use contracts to try and duplicate the effects of intellectual property, and asked that people not pirate his book. I found it interesting that he neither advocated outright abolition, the way many libertarians do, nor advocated keeping it in its current form. Of course, he does strike me as the sort of person who would have a nuanced view.

    I’m guessing Huemer would hope people would purchase his book, rather than simply reading your webbed version, but at the same time I doubt he will try to sue you for copyright infringement or force you to take it down. For my part, I think I shall encourage people to buy it, (and/or his other books,) to support him, but also thank you for webbing it. I really hope as many people read it as possible, and I would rather they read it without supporting Huemer financially than not read it at all.

  • #248

    Im1wthu11
    Participant

    I’ve never read any of his work. I’ve only seen video on Larkin Rose and read one of his books.

  • #255

    Jacob
    Keymaster

    I think you may enjoy reading Huemer’s book, Im1wthu11. I think part of the reason I liked it was because I have an obsessively analytical personality, and Huemer goes into such detail. He goes to great lengths to figure out the best possible defenses of government and to clearly explain why they fail. I think he does a great job of making readers feel like he’s thought of whatever concerns or objections they might raise. Even when he doesn’t explicitly discuss an objection, one gets the impression he probably thought of it, weighed it against other things he could talk about, and chose which points to discuss carefully and deliberately.

    He also has a matter-of-fact way of writing, which works because he combines it with detailed discussions that help readers accept that he has earned his conclusiveness, even if they disagree with him.

    I’m not sure if I’d say it’s my absolute favorite philosophy book, but it’s one of my favorites. I enjoy dreaming about being able to write as well as he can, someday.

    • #259

      Im1wthu11
      Participant

      It is called “The Most Dangerous Superstition” by Larken Rose.

  • #301

    Hogeye
    Participant

    The Most Dangerous Superstition (pdf)

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by  Hogeye.
    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by  Hogeye.
  • #345

    Hogeye
    Participant

    At the next Fayetteville Freethinker meeting I am doing a book review of “The Problem of Political Authority.”

  • #346

    Spooner Bookman
    Participant

    Whenever I’m feeling down in the dumps, I just Google ‘Larken Rose quotes’, pick one at random to read, and am instantly cheered up… My all time favorite (so far):

    Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day.

    Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.

    Steal a fish from one guy and give it to another–and keep doing that on a daily basis–and you’ll make the first guy pissed off, but you’ll make the second guy lazy and dependent on you. Then you can tell the second guy that the first guy is greedy for wanting to keep the fish he caught. Then the second guy will cheer for you to steal more fish. Then you can prohibit anyone from fishing without getting permission from you. Then you can expand the racket, stealing fish from more people and buying the loyalty of others. Then you can get the recipients of the stolen fish to act as your hired thugs. Then you can … well, you know the rest.

  • #348

    Jacob
    Keymaster

    @hogeye, When is the Fayetteville Freethinker meeting that you’re doing the book review at? I’m not a big fan of that group, but I might go anyway to hear your review.

    @im1wthu11, I may read Larkin’s book, it does sound interesting. I’m usually into books with a more scholarly, or academic flavor to them, though, compared to books that try to appeal to laymen, which seems at first glance like what The Most Dangerous Superstition does.

    @Roth, That quote from Larkin is awesome.

  • #352

    Hogeye
    Participant

    Fayetteville Freethinkers meets on May 27 at 1pm at the Fayetteville Library.

  • #359

    Hogeye
    Participant

    Correction: Saturday, May 27 at 2pm, according to their site. http://fayfreethinkers.com

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